Monthly Archives: November 2012

7 Quick Ways To Personalise Your Rental Home

Published by:

Moving into a rental home can be a wonderful thing. You finally have your own space, some privacy and can invite your friends around when you want. All rental leases come with restrictions, like no picture hangers on the walls or no use of double sided tape. As you place your furniture and knick knacks around the rooms, it would be nice to put your personal stamp on this newly rented home. This is, in fact, easier than you think.

How to Display Photos

There are many ways to display photos without hanging them on walls. For a large quantity of photos, you could buy a large tri-fold room divider which is capable of holding A4 size photos, as well as numerous smaller ones. For single photos, use frames of assorted sizes. Photo flip books or coffee table size books printed with your personal photos are another great idea.

Photos - Desk Calendars

Colour Theme

Choose your favourite colour theme and incorporate it into lounge cushions, tablecloths and placemats, floor rugs and curtains. In fact, your preferred colour can be used anywhere to accessorise and personalise your rental home.

Don’t Be Afraid to Ask The Landlord

If the wall colour scheme is not to your liking or is a little drab, perhaps you could ask the landlord if they would give permission for you to paint it. The landlord would have to approve the colour of course, but most landlords are quite happy for you to do this. Sometimes they are time poor and have just not got around to doing it themselves. Often they will deduct the cost of the paint from your rent.

It’s Too Dark

Rental properties can often be dark because they are filled with older light fittings. The use of free standing floor lamps and table lamps can brighten up the rooms to bring a totally different perspective to a dingy dark area.

Collections

If you are a collector, whether it be Star Wars or Batman memorabilia, tea pots, teddy bears or antiques, display these in a glass fronted cabinet or open style cube display case and you will have a great conversation starter when visitors call around.

Let Your Home Reflect Your Lifestyle

If you are dedicated to reading or watching dvds or if you love house plants, keep these things on display. It is important to reflect your lifestyle in the décor of your home.

Customised photos

With the hundreds of photos that you would have on file, why not turn some of them into personalised wall or desk calendars? You could also have photos printed onto mouse mats or custom mugs to bring an extra personal touch to your rental home.

Bear in mind this is a rental home. You may live in it for a long time or you may only reside in it for a short time, but it should reflect your personal touch and style. If your home doesn’t suit your personality, it could have negative effect on you. Make sure everything you use to add your personal touch to this home can be taken with you.

How To Choose An Air Compressor

Published by:

Air CompressorAnyone who is going to use air tools is going to need a compressor. It doesn’t matter if they are using an impact wrench for mechanic’s work, an air nailer for construction, or any other pneumatic tool, without a compressor to power the tool; it’s going to do no more work than be a paperweight. The right air compressor is just as important as the tools that it is going to power.

So, how do you select the right air compressor? For a lot of people, it’s just a matter of looking over the compressors available, and picking out one they like. However, this is kind of a haphazard way of buying an expensive piece of equipment. It’s better to have some idea of what one is looking for, before starting to look.

Gas vs. Electric

Most air compressors on the market are electric powered. They have to be plugged into a normal 120 VAC outlet for power. But, what do you do when there’s no electric power to run the compressor? In those cases many people have to use a generator to power their compressor. That’s just one more piece of equipment to carry around.

If one is working on a lot of job sites where electricity isn’t available, it’s a good idea to buy a gas powered compressor. That reduces the amount of equipment that needs to be dragged to the job site, and the gas powered compressor will be more fuel efficient than powering an electric compressor off of a generator.

When selecting an electric compressor, it is important to keep in mind the maximum current draw of the compressor. When the motor starts, it draws a surge of power. That’s the worst power consumption. If there’s ever a time when the compressor is going to trip a circuit breaker, that’s the time. Remember, most outlets are only on 20 amp breakers. Manufacturers keep this in mind with their designs, but a big compressor running off the same circuit as other equipment can still trip a breaker.

What do the Specs Mean?

While I suppose it’s possible to buy a compressor just based upon how it looks, that’s really not much of a criteria. You’ve got to understand what the specs are and what they mean. Here are the basic specs that you’ll be looking at:

Motor size – measured in horsepower (HP). Everyone likes to brag about the horsepower, but it really doesn’t mean much of anything. The only time it comes into consideration is when comparing two compressors which are otherwise equal. The higher horsepower compressor doesn’t have to work as hard, so it will probably last longer.

Tank capacity – measured in gallons. This is somewhat important. The larger the tank, the longer your air tools can run off of the “bottled” air, before the compressor needs to turn on again. You don’t want the compressor running at any more than a 60% duty cycle, or there’s a good chance the motor will burn out. More than anything, tank capacity is a convenience. If you are running tools that consume a lot of air for several minutes at a time, with rest periods for the compressor to recover between times, a larger tank helps. Likewise if you have several people working off the same compressor.

Weight – measured in pounds. If the compressor is a portable unit, this is important. Some of these babies can be heavy enough to really mess up your back if you try and pick them up. For mobile operations, like construction work, a lighter weight compressor is helpful.

Max pressure – measured in pounds per square inch (PSI). This is not very important, as pretty much every compressor on the market provides more pressure than air tools need. As long as the compressor will produce 120 PSI, you can run almost anything on it. There are a few high-power tools which require more than 120 PSI; in those cases, you need to pay attention to this specification.

Air capacity – measured in cubic feet per minute (CFM). This is the single most important specification on any air compressor, and for some reason most manufacturers hide it in the small print. This is how much air the compressor is able to compress at a particular pressure. Typically, manufacturers will rate their compressors at two different pressures, 40 PSI and 90 PSI. As there aren’t any air tools which use only 40 PSI of air, that really doesn’t mean much, it’s the 90 PSI figure that counts. This is critical information, as the air capacity of the compressor must be higher than the air consumption of the tools that will be attached to it.

Air Compressor Styles

There are several common styles of air compressors. While they all pretty much do the same thing, the form factor is different, intended to be used in different ways.

Pancake – These compressors are small units, typically with a six gallon round tank. They are compact units, which makes them very popular with contractors, for powering air nailers. The Porter Cable C2002WK is a popular model of this style compressor.

Hotdog Portable – These are very small compressors, designed for high portability. Typically the tank is only one or two gallons. Like the pancake, they don’t have wheels, but are light enough to carry. The Senco PC1010 is a good example of this type of compressor.

Twin Tank – These are another compact compressor style, designed to be carried. The major difference between one of these and the hotdog is that it has more tank capacity; about twice what the hotdog has. Gauges and controls are mounted on a control panel, for those that like that. They usually have two air chucks, as opposed to the single chuck that most compressors have. The Makita MAC2400 is a good example of this style.

Wheelbarrow – Wheelbarrow compressors are twin tank units with a single wheel. Handles at the other end allow the compressor to be moved much like a wheelbarrow. These are higher capacity units, with much larger tanks, somewhere between 5 and 8 gallons total capacity.

Horizontal – This is the “standard” compressor design, with wheels at one end and a handle at the other to move it around. Horizontal compressors vary incredibly in their capacity, with tanks all the way up to 20 gallons. The larger ones can power two to three air tools at a time. The Campbell Hausfeld HL540100AV is a great example of a horizontal compressor.

Vertical – Vertical compressors are not designed to be portable, but are rather shop compressors. By turning the tank vertically, the compressor takes up less floor space in the shop. These are high capacity compressors, with tanks up to 40 gallons in size. They are intended for use with multiple air tools at a time. DeWalt’s D55168 is a small vertical compressor.

Air Consumption

As I’ve already mentioned, the most important specification on an air compressor is the amount of compressed air that is produces. If a compressor can’t produce enough air to power the tools being connected to it, it is essentially worthless. This table should help in determining how much air capacity you need in your compressor. Keep in mind that these are approximations; you need to check the actual specifications of the tools you are going to use, as specifications can vary.

Author Bio: Ryan Hill is a review expert especially when it comes to explaining the difference between certain power tools.  Find more information about power tool reviews by visiting his website.

Gardening: Tips on Growing Plants Whether Indoor or Outdoor

Published by:

Gardening is the art of producing and nurturing plants, and is associated with a specific field in science called horticulture. Decorative flowers or shrubs are included in a garden’s ornamental façade while some other plants associated with gardening are produced for consumption. Some of these consumption purposes may include even herbal medicines and beautifying materials for the skin and body.

Gardening:  Hobby or Business?

Gardening: Tips on Growing Plants Whether Indoor or Outdoor

Gardening makes a person more in touch with fine details of nature. Here, they gain mindful thought of living things that rely on their nurturing abilities in order to grow. Some people find it esteeming when their efforts are paying off, and the garden is in full bloom. From the time that seeds were planted until plants or trees mature, some said the feeling is stress-relieving when they come out alive.

Some ended up investing in the art and gained profit out of doing what they love. They offer services to residential places, corporate rooftops, and terrace gardens – for high-rise residential places. They can even supply ornaments and flowers when needed for a special occasion. This kind of business would require a piece of land for cultivation of plants and flowers. The most important part is manpower consisting of gardeners and landscapists. It requires a timeframe and due diligence should be backed up by thorough maintenance as seeds are grown in to plants and/or trees.

Outdoor Gardening

There is a lot of time required for a person to dedicate in gardening, so it takes a form of calling and love for this science. There are also some materials that they need to invest on especially if they are considering outdoor gardening. They have to begin with pampering a lawn, designing a landscape and maintaining it against withering and falling apart. Labor in outdoor gardening has the tendency to be intensive as time is of the essence. Keeping up with outdoor gardening also requires that it sustain the weather and people who would pass by it.

Indoor Gardening

Would it be too much to ask that a garden will look like according to one’s current mood? Sometimes, people who grow plants would prefer a garden that will look different from time to time. This is one benefit of indoor gardening or terrace gardening because plants are held by pots, which can be easily moved anywhere. One important thing to remember is the make of pots to be used. Depending on what plant to nurture, pots bought – or made – should withstand the weight of the plant as it grows. It is also significant that pots are checked according to how a plant’s roots grow. Once these factors are checked, find a heavy-duty pot which will withstand the plant as it matures. Plants do not mature on their own, so pots should be able to go through moist, wetness and heat. It should be built to sustain heaviness of the soil together with the growing plant over periods of time.

Gardening is not supposed to be easy. A garden in full bloom takes so much patience to achieve, and eats up a lot of time as it is being tended. Whether as a hobby or business, directly to the earth or grown in a pot a plant’s life depends on a green thumb. If a person has one may be it is a clue, and there will never be harm in trying to get closer to nature.